Books & Reports

  • NEW REPORT: A New Direction in U.S.-Russia Relations?

    The Center for the National Interest is pleased to announce the release of A New Direction in U.S.-Russia Relations? America’s Challenges & Opportunities in Dealing with Russia, with contributions from Thomas Graham (Kissinger Associates, Inc.), Nikolas K. Gvosdev (U.S. Naval War College), Michael Kofman (CNA Corporation), and Matthew Rojansky (Kennan Institute, Woodrow Wilson Center). Paul J.

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  • Book: Want, Waste or War?

    Want, Waste or War?: The Global Resource Nexus and the Struggle for Land, Energy, Food, Water and Minerals (2015, Routledge) explores the nexus approach, “conceptualized as attention to resource connections and their governance ramifications” and “calls attention to the sustainability of contemporary consumer resource use, lifestyles and supply chains.” The volume was co-authored by the Center for

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  • Report: Rethinking U.S. Strategy in the Middle East

    President Barack Obama’s Middle East policies have come under increasingly sharp criticism since the emergence of ISIL as a threat to Iraq during the summer of 2014. Some of this criticism has come from predictable quarters: neoconservatives and liberal interventionists who have long been critical of the Obama administration’s relatively “soft touch” approach to the

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  • Report: Tackling Asia’s Greatest Challenges

    On June 18th, Center for the National Interest released a report edited and co-authored by Harry J. Kazianis, Senior Fellow for Defense Policy and Executive Editor of The National Interest, which focuses on cooperation between the United States, Japan, and Vietnam in the Asia-Pacific region. The report, Tackling Asia’s Greatest Challenges: A U.S.-Japan-Vietnam Trilateral Report, examines

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  • Report: Looking at a Silver Bullet or Seeking Greater Energy Security

    All human activity requires energy—and the more energy one has, the more one can do. As a result, energy has been a central element of national power throughout history. In the distant past, building Egypt’s pyramids, Rome’s vast network of roads, and China’s Great Wall required enormous biological energy—food to support populations that could supply

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