Videos

  • Senator Tom Cotton and Panel on Missile Defense

    As Washington watches North Korea develop missile capabilities that endanger U.S. allies, U.S. military installations in East Asia, and soon U.S. territory, missile defense has assumed new prominence in America’s national security debates. Missile defense technologies promise protection from grave threats. Yet, there are also many questions, including whether missile defense deployments may spur other

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  • America’s Role in a Changing Middle East

    The wave of protests and violence that swept the Middle East—and the varying reactions of the its governments—have dramatically affected the region. While U.S. policy may have contributed to some of these developments over a period of decades, U.S. leaders have struggled to manage them even as other external actors have become increasingly involved in

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  • Dealing with Dictators

    The Center for the National Interest hosted a discussion entitled “Dealing with Dictators” on Monday, June 19. Former Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Paula J. Dobriansky moderated. Americans have debated U.S. relations with authoritarian leaders and their governments for decades. Since entering office, President Donald Trump has met authoritarian leaders from China, Saudi

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  • Preventive War: Does it Work?

    The Center for the National Interest hosted a panel discussion entitled “Preventive War: Does It Work?” with James Carafano, Vice President for Foreign and Defense Policy Studies at the Heritage Foundation, and Michael O’Hanlon, Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution. Dov Zakheim, a former Under Secretary of Defense in the George W.

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  • U.S. Sanctions on Russia: Objectives, Impacts, and Options

    The Obama administration imposed several rounds of U.S. economic sanctions on Moscow in a series of executive orders following Russia’s annexation of Crimea and its support for separatist rebels in eastern Ukraine. So far, the Trump administration has not signaled any intent to change U.S. sanctions policy absent changes in Russia’s conduct. Nevertheless, concerns that

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